The Ghar

An example of Bestia Khrok Ghar, or Ghar in common.

The Khrok sub species known as the Ghar originate from the mangroves and tree lined rivers of the Haanjagala. 

Khrok are patient hunters, waiting for hours underwater for their prey. They favour hooked weapons which they can use to snag fishermen and beasts and then drag them into the water, often in a rolling motion using their mass to create tearing torsion on their prey as they go under, tearing muscle and breaking bone with the force. Many a villager has had to watch the mangled remains of a prize animal or a loved one being dragged from a muddy river by one of these beasts, as it slinks off to eat its prize. 

Khrok live in tight knit groups ranging over a large territory. They are a matriarchal society that venerates the oldest of their kind. The eldest female leads, both domestically and militarily. They also perform a shamanistic role in their society, interpreting the will of the gods and wielding magic granted to them. The average Khrok is a challenge to deal with, a Khrok Matriarch is a terrifying prospect due to their ferocity, cunning, patience and primal magic. The older a Khrok gets, the larger it gets. Thankfully for most the average Khrok is only a little taller than most men. But there are a few in each group that grow to gigantic sizes, easily able to take on Trolls, Ogres and the largest Orruks with ease. 

All Khrok have thick scaly skin covering incredibly dense muscle and iron like bones. They easily shrug off damage that other bestials would consider fatal. They can quite comfortably tear a man’s arm off with little effort, or grab him with their jaws and thrash them around till they stop moving. 

The Ghar as a sub-species have adapted trimmer snouts so they can root out fish and certain types of eels that nest in the mangroves and river banks of the Haanjagala, using them for rituals during gatherings, to create personal ungents to be imbibed, or as offerings. Their narrower snouts are also less noticeable when coming up for air during a hunt, whereas their relatives with broader snouts can be quite apparent in the water.

Thankfully it is very rare for Khrok to gather and go raiding or make all out war. This only happens if a major trespass has been made against them or if the signs have been interpreted as favourable in the extreme, often focused on a singular goal, be it a person, a place, or an item. 

The Ghar’s matriarchs tend to offer up far more balanced interpretations of the gods will compared to the bellicose ones of their relatives living in the dry seasonal wadis and rivers of Ilshana’s western deserts, or the esoteric and unfathomable ones of their kin in Ilshana’s south western jungles. 

My advice to travellers in the Haanjagala and Ilshana; Beware the glistening eyes on the rivers and banks at night. They may searching for something larger than fish to get their teeth into while out for a swim….

~ Filib Stjerne, Scholar of Theriology at the Learning Halls of Esel-Din. Author of “The Superior Hunter’s guide to the Beastly Mind. A cultural and psychological treatise on the Gor-kin”

Nazgob Triumphant!

A bit of an indulgence away from the usual stuff.

My local GW store, in Milton Keynes, had it’s anniversary today. Along with all the usual goodies and special edition models, they held their store competition. And I did pretty well with Nazgob as my entry, nabbing the award for best converted mini. 

Needless to say I’m pretty chuffed. It’s a huge boost to my confidence in my skills, particularly sculpting and converting. So much so that I’m considering a few endeavors that I’m hoping will come to fruition next year, so watch this space!

~ Mark Talmer

Building Yss

I felt it was time to build a new gaming board that could be used for AoS (and occasionally for Historicals). I’ve spent about six or so months looking up youtube tutorials and educating myself on various techniques and materials in preperation for the big build. 

Board wise I contemplated a number of options and their pro’s and cons, before settling on a modular system which I could add scatter terrain to. In the end I went for Sally 4th’s Terra-Former Tiles, a well rounded range of MDF frames with a magnetic locking system. The frames themselves are well designed and do pretty much what they say on the site. The neodynium magnets really lock them together really well and the frames are nice and sturdy. I used superglue to put mine together for speed and efficiency, but woodglue would be perfect if drying times aren’t an issue for you.

The frames require some form of polystyrene filler, either the simple jablite stuff or the lovely pink insulation foam. I went with jablite for affordabilities sake and ease of access. While jablite isn’t my first choice for terrain building it is fine for this, as it will be covered up with filler and pva to strengthen it. To save time I whipped up a template to help with cutting out the inserts. Having to hand measure each one prior to cutting would have been labourious and tedious. With the template it was barely a twenty minute job to cut all of them out and fit them. Make sure you use a nice sharp blade to cut them, I used a snap off knife with the blade extended all the way to cut mine clean through.

Then it was a case of gluing and adding detail. The cliff faces are made from discarded slate shards I found in the fathers hoarded building material pile. I just stacked them up and glued them in place. I used PVA which I regretted, as it didn’t really stick them down all too well, it was the filler that really secured them in place. Next time I’ll use the hot glue gun. 

Then it was on to adding filler. I used plain old polyfiller. I did start putting it on with a spatula, but it started looking unnatural, so I slipped on some gloves and applied it by hand. It’s helped maintain a natural look and allowed me to get the filler into all the nooks and crannies around the cliffs and into the stream bed.

Once dry, I added some citadel trees and textured the board with coarse and light sand, along with aquarium gravel for smaller rocks. The larger rocks were either slate or decorative garden stones. When applying the sand I used a watered down mix of pva with a little flow aid added.

Then I painted it all. A black undercoat on everything, with some zenithal highlights of a medium grey on the trees, cliffs, and rocks, along with some splashes on the dirt. Then I added a chocolate brown emulsion, and once dried I used a large make up powder brush to drybrush the whole board with Buff Titanium from Daler Rowney. It took about thirty minutes to drybrush the whole board. I’ll be buying more make up brushes from mini painting after seeing how effective it was, after a quick wash it was good as new with zero wear. If I had used my usual choice it would have killed the brush and only been good for rubbish jobs after. 

Flocking was fairly easy, I used the same watered down pva mix with flow aid to spritz the sections. Then I went along the edges of each section with the mid green flock so as to prevent strange lines cutting off between sections. Then I gently added light and dark tones before giving the whole thing a hit with mid green flock. I simply sprinkled everything on, as just chucking on the flock creates a lot of waste. 

After this I started detailing….

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Some links for folks.

Materials.

Sally 4th, suppliers of the Terra-Former Tiles.

Arcane Scenery, suppliers of the various flocks, foliage etc. 

B&Q, for the polystyrene, woodglue etc. 

Tutorials.

TheTerrainTutor

Lukes APS